Give Thanks Together

(This devotion is day twenty of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read Psalm 95

We often think of spiritual disciplines only in personal, individual terms. I should read my Bible. I should pray. I should give thanks. This is certainly important. Some people neglect personal habits and only study Scripture or pray when they’re gathering with other believers. Neither gutter is healthy. We need to prioritize seeking to know God on our own and with others. As we learn about and practice thanksgiving, we do it together. Doing so not only exalts God and emboldens our faith, but it encourages other believers.

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Grateful for Grace

(This devotion is day nineteen of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read 1 Timothy 1:12–17; Ephesians 2:1-10; 2 Corinthians 4:15

What’s your story? What’s your testimony? If you’re a believer in Christ, do you remember the wonderful gift of salvation when Jesus rescued you?

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The Sun Will Come Up Again

(This devotion is day eighteen of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read Psalm 30

One thing I’m learning in parenting is not to over-react. It’s easy to freak out in the moment, whether in anger or fear as small things feel mammoth. My daughter spills her drink on the floor (again), and my frustration is bigger than her mistake. Or she has a cold that sounds bad, and the great anxiety-giver of the internet makes us think she has a severe illness, so we elevate it to a code-red.

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The Thanksgiving Meal

(This devotion is day seventeen of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read Matthew 26:26–29; Hebrews 8:6–13

The Lord’s Supper. Communion. The Eucharist. The New Covenant meal Jesus inaugurated and served up to his disciples on the night of his betrayal is called many things. Whatever terms your church tradition uses, this sacrament (or ordinance) is a visible sign and seal of the gospel. Since the church’s inception, Christian’s have regularly celebrated it together in local churches to visibly proclaim the gospel and feed on Christ.

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Training Our Tongues to Say Thanks

(This devotion is day sixteen of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read Psalm 33

I have a wonderful two-year-old daughter. The early days of her life consisted of feeding her, changing her, and trying anything to make her sleep. Now she’s much more interactive. She says funny things and sweet things, and sassy things too. It feels like every week she learns new skills, sentences, and behaviors. Some words came natural: mine, now, and I want to. Others took more work. Words like please, sorry, and thank you need encouraged and reinforced.

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Thanks Be to God

(This devotion is day fifteen of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read Romans 6

Sometimes we ignore giving thanks because we’ve become used to something, or someone. My wife does many things for our family, including cooking delicious meals. Sometimes I make the meal, but I’m more of the sous-chef and taste-tester than the master chef she is. While I’m grateful for her loving our family through a home-cooked meal, anytime something becomes common there’s a danger of overlooking it. Or maybe we feel thankful, but we show our gratitude a little less because we’re accustomed to it. This happens in the home, the office, and in the church. But it also happens in our spiritual life.

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God’s Steadfast Love Endures Forever

(This devotion is day fourteen of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read Psalm 136

The Psalmist opens (1-3) and closes (26) this song with the call to give thanks. In between, he moves from God’s glorious attributes and powerful acts seen in Creation (4-9), Redemption (10-22), and ongoing Provision (23-25). There is more than enough reason to thank God in each realm. Anchoring every verse is the refrain: “for his steadfast love endures forever.” This Psalm lays down an excellent foundation for thanksgiving rooted in who God is for His people.

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Grief and Gratitude

(This devotion is day thirteen of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read Psalm 28

As you read through this Psalm, you might have wondered if you had the right verses. If thanksgiving is supposed to be joyful, why are we reading such a downer of a psalm?

Psalm 28 is a lament psalm. David seeks God’s mercy in distressed circumstances. It’s not until verse six that his tone shifts, and even then, it’s not because he has an epiphany or his enemies flee.

So why didn’t I choose a more positive, even peppy, psalm? It’s because this is real-life. While some Christian literature and music oversell us on a mountaintop faith without valleys, that’s not the biblical portrait of life in a fallen world. As Jesus told us, in this world we will have troubles (John 16:33). David teaches us we can be both sorrowful and rejoicing. Grief and gratitude can go together. We can lament and give thanks to the same God at the same time, even in the same circumstances.

I hope that’s an encouragement to you. Life with Christ gives rest. His commands aren’t burdensome (1 John 5:3). Grace upon grace abound toward us and cover us (John 1:16; Romans 5:20). But unfortunately, we add burdens, expectations, and crushing guilt on our shoulders that Jesus never intended us to carry. Sometimes we put them there. Sometimes others pile them on us. And sometimes our enemy drops them on us like a ton of bricks. In a moment of stillness, you feel the weight upon you.

One way this plays itself out is many Christians assume they’ve done something wrong when life is hard. We wrongly assume trials are a sign of God’s displeasure. We might think we’re called to put on a happy face no matter what, never experiencing emotion through storms, never grieving brokenness, and never lamenting injustices. This might seem like a small thing, but God never calls us to a fake happiness where we’re fading on the inside while forcing a smile on the outside. The Christian life isn’t one of gloom-and-doom, but it’s also not one of eternal sunshine where clouds never cross our path.

David’s Trust in Trials

David offers us encouragement by how he endures hardship honestly. He feels turmoil through trials and he laments struggles, whether they be attacks from enemies or God’s seeming silence. And yet, he trusts in God and gives thanks to God who hears our cries for mercy (28:6), is our strength and shield (28:7), our helper (28:7), a refuge (28:8), and a shepherd who carries us (28:9). In trials, we trust. Trust allows us to bring both our complaints to Him in lament and our praise to Him in thanksgiving.

As David gives thanks to God rather than grumbles to himself, fears give way to faith. The more he considers what he’s facing, while also considering the God who has his back, the more his confidence grows that God will deliver him again. By praying, his frustration with God’s silence begins turns to trust that God hears and will act. All of this leads him to recall who God is—a shield, strength, and shepherd—so he can bless His name.

David gives thanks to God in advance of receiving the answer to his prayer (28:7). That’s faith. He knows God hears and will take care of this situation in faithfulness and love. His giving thanks is a down-payment of gratitude, not just for God listening, but in belief God will answer His cry.

Paul talks about this kind of praying with thanksgiving in Colossians 4:2. “Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving.” To be watchful in thanksgiving as we pray suggests we’re looking for God to answer. Our heart possesses both trust and thankfulness, so much so that even before we see our prayer answered, we’re giving thanks and watching in hope.

This psalm teaches us to pray when our faith is weak and our trust is leaking. Don’t wait to have an unshakeable faith to turn to God. In stresses and sorrows, and in weakness or wavering, talk to God and consider His faithfulness. As we do so, our low-levels of trust begin to be refueled. As trust grows, our perspective changes.

May we be like David in our weariness and discouragement by still proclaiming, “In Him my heart trusts” (28:7). One way we do this is by giving thanks, even when there’s just as much to lament as there is to be thankful for. God is still our helper. He’s our shield, savior, strength, and shepherd. God will deliver us and carry us. God isn’t distant but is present. Our prayers are not going unheard since He always hears our cries.

Talk to Him. Lament to Him. And also give thanks to Him. Mercy is on its way, if it hasn’t already landed on your doorstep.

 

God’s Wonderful Deeds

(This devotion is day twelve of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read Psalm 9

We could all use a little more joy in our day. And not the fake-smile, posing for people kind, but real joy where rest and rejoicing come together, much like peanut butter and chocolate do for Peanut Butter M&M’s (so good). How can we find this kind of joy, in the best of times and the worst of times?

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Record and Recall

(This devotion is day eleven of a 30-Day Thanksgiving Challenge. Each day includes a daily reading that will be accompanied by a post on this blog.)

Read 1 Chronicles 16:1–36

What are landmark moments in your life? Can you recall times where God did something big in your life or taught you something? What are some of God’s wonderful works in your life, in your family, or in the life of your church? (These aren’t theoretical questions, so take a moment to answer them.) How did you celebrate those times and how do you commemorate them after the fact?

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