Teaching and Encouraging through Singing

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teaching and admonishing one another in all wisdom, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, with thankfulness in your hearts to God.” (Col. 3:16)

(In yesterday’s post I shared stories of how the gathered church singing together encouraged me when I needed it most. Today’s part 2 provides more of the biblical basis for how important singing with and to one another is every week.)

In your mind, go back to a recent Sunday morning where you gathered with God’s people in your local church. One thing you did (I hope) was sing. When you sing, who do you sing to? In that scenario, do you sing to God, to other people, or to your own heart? How do you process congregational singing? You could ask, who do you sing for? Are you singing to glorify God, to rehearse truth to yourself or give voice to your beliefs, or do you sing to build up others?

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Ironies of the Cross

good fridayLike any good narrative, the Bible uses literary devices such as metaphors, double-meanings, paradoxes, and irony. The New Testament authors often used irony to draw out the difference between how mankind sees things from their perspective and how God sees things from His perspective. Irony also helps create a sharp contrast between expectations and realities as well as between intent and effect. A third way authors employ irony is to highlight something the readers know that the characters in the story would have been unaware of.

In Colossians 2:13-15 Paul provides at least four ironies tied to the cross of Jesus Christ. We see stark contrasts between the purpose of man and the purpose of God, Satan’s plan for destruction and God’s plan for redemption. The cross reminds us things are often not what they seem in this life. Circumstances and the point of view of fallen man is not a reliable source for interpreting life because God is working in ways we cannot see. God’s economy is different than our own. It is in the darkest moments that the greatest light shines. It is in act of death that life is granted. We will briefly look at four ironies of Jesus’ cross from Colossians 2:13-15 in order to understand what was really taking place.

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Sweeping Statements in Colossians

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As I’ve been studying Colossians the last few weeks I’ve been amazed by the glorious, sweeping statements about the supremacy and sole-sufficiency of Jesus Christ. Colossians is all about clarifying just who this Jesus is and why nothing and no one else needs added to him. Even when it seems like it’s not about him it is all about him. For example, the whole point of the vain and empty ascetic lifestyle that can’t stop the desires of the flesh (2:20-23) is to demonstrate the supremacy of Jesus who puts to death the flesh in us and resurrects as new people (2:11-14; 3:1-4). As our eyes are redirected towards him we see equally glorious, sweeping statements made about us in him. We’re told not only who we now are in Christ but what’s true of us and what belongs to us because we are in Christ. The book has a lot less than other NT books on how to live the Christian life but it more than makes up for this by showing us the blueprint of truly living (Jesus) and reminding us we are now being remade in him. When you can’t get him out of your mind he will show up in your life (your affections and actions). Here are some of those gigantic statements about Jesus and then about us in him I’ve found in Colossians.

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